Events | 活动

MCI hosts lunchtime seminars, early career researcher [ECR] workshops, book launches, and informal salons.

The University of Manchester is committed to academic independence and the freedom of speech. Recording events without the written consent of all participants is prohibited.

MCI events are usually held in the Lee Kai Hung Building at 178 Waterloo Place, a historic building on Oxford Road just north of the Manchester Museum. Due to COVID-19, however, all Autumn 2020 events will be held as online webinars.

Join our mailing list to be kept up to date with all MCI events and activities: mci@manchester.ac.uk

Upcoming events

Jingran Yu - A Better Experience, or a Better Investment? A Case Study of Chinese Students at a British Branch Campus in China [Early Career Researcher Workshop]

12:30 - 13:30 25 February 2021

With public higher education funding being repeatedly cut, UK universities have been extending their market within international students’ home countries through transnational education (TNE). Despite its growing presence and increasing importance, TNE has hitherto been an under-researched topic, particularly in China, the country hosting th..

Fuchsia Dunlop - A Taste of Kung Pao Chicken

12:30 - 13:30 02 March 2021

Kung Pao or Gong Bao chicken is one of the best known Chinese dishes, almost universally adored and found on menus everywhere from state banquets in Beijing to the American fast-food chain Panda Express. It is even one of the dishes provided to Chinese astronauts on their voyages into space. But where does the dish actually come from, and what..

China and the World after Covid-19: A Conversation & Book Launch with Orville Schell

17:00 - 18:30 10 March 2021

This webinar will commence with a discussion of the legacies of China’s Cold War past in Chinese domestic and foreign policies today, before exploring the prospects for China’s relations with the world after Covid-19. Orville Schell has written ten nonfiction books about China and has written extensively about China for The New Yorker, T..

Tobias Ross - The Chinese Football Dream: How voluntarily-driven is China’s private football boom? [Early Career Researcher Workshop]

12:30 - 13:30 23 March 2021

Since initiating a set of large-scale reforms in the field of football at the highest political level in 2014, China is aiming to become a leading football nation by 2050. With a clear focus on a strong men’s national team, China’s professional football clubs should function as breeding grounds for local talent and a driver of a still comp..

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