#StopAsianHate. Do gendered stereotypes of race shape patterns of prejudice and aggression against Asian and Black men?

The hashtag 'Stop Asian Hate'

Spring 2020 witnessed a rise in anti-Asian Covid-related prejudice in the United States. Summer 2020 then witnessed tens of millions of Americans demonstrating in Black Lives Matter #BLM protests following the killing of George Floyd in Minneapolis. In May 2021, a mass shooting in Atlanta that killed six Asian women then galvanized an emerging #StopAsianHate movement.

These racial hate incidents raise a series of questions: Do gendered stereotypes of race shape patterns of prejudice and aggression against Asian and Black men? Might emasculating stereotypes about Asian men (as low in physical strength) encourage anger and opportunistic aggression against them? Might hypermasculine stereotypes about black men (as physically formidable) inflate fear, increasing disproportionate (e.g. lethal) uses of force against them?

The MCI research lab is addressing these questions in a series of studies using a variety of methods, including surveys, experiments, quantitative social media content analysis and qualitative discourse analysis. In Summer 2021, two 2nd year Politics students from The University of Manchester joined the research project through the Q-Step Internship Programme.

Research Team:

  • Peter Gries
  • Cong Peng
  • Carwyn Morris
  • Paton Yam
  • Tao Wang
  • Elena Keefe
  • Ihesinachi Oyouwa Oko-Jaja